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Carb Information for Corn

Corn Carbs, Glycemic Index, Nutritional Information

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Updated May 30, 2014

Grilled corn
Randy Mayor/Photographer's Choice RF/Getty Images
Corn is usually thought of as a vegetable, but it is probably more accurately categorized as a grain (and, indeed, is sometimes called a "whole grain"). A corn plant is essentially a grass with exceptionally large leaves and seeds. Given this, it should be no surprise that corn is high in carbohydrates, mainly starch. Yellow and white corn have similar nutritional profiles, including in terms of carbohydrates. There is not a lot of nutritional information available for other colors of corn, such as blue corn. Carb information on cornmeal, polenta and grits

Carbohydrate and Fiber Counts for Corn

  • ½ cup raw corn kernels: 18 grams effective (net) carbohydrate plus 3 grams fiber and 89 calories

  • 1 small ear corn (5½ to 6½ inches long; about 3 oz.): 20 grams effective (net) carbohydrate plus 2 grams fiber and 96 calories

  • 1 large ear corn (7¾ to 9 inches long; 4-4½ oz.): 27 grams effective (net) carbohydrate plus 3 grams fiber and 127 calories

  • ½ cup canned corn kernels: 14 grams effective (net) carbohydrate plus 2 grams fiber and 67 calories

  • ½ cup frozen (unprepared) corn: 15 grams effective (net) carbohydrate plus 2 grams fiber and 72 calories

Glycemic Index for Corn

Glycemic index studies of corn report averages of anywhere from 37 to 62. An average GI of 54 is commonly used.

More Information about the Glycemic Index

Estimated Glycemic Load of Corn

  • ½ cup raw corn kernals: 8

  • 1 small ear corn (5½ to 6½ inches long; about 3 oz.): 9

  • 1 large ear corn (7¾ to 9 inches long; 4-4½ oz.): 12

  • ½ cup canned corn kernals: 6

  • ½ cup frozen (unprepared) corn:7

More Information About the Glycemic Load

Health Benefits of Corn

Corn is a very good source of thiamin, and a good source of folate, vitamin C, niacin, and pantothenic acid. Yellow (but not white) corn is an excellent source of lutein and zeaxanthin.

Low-Carb Recipes with Corn?

Well, no, I don't have any low-carb recipes with corn, but this recipe with yellow squash is similar to a corn casserole:

More Information About Corn at Calorie Count.

More Carb Profiles:
Sources:

Leroux, MarcusFoster-Powell, Kaye, Holt, Susanna and Brand-Miller, Janette. "International table of glycemic index and glycemic load values: 2002." American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Vol. 76, No. 1, 5-56, (2002).

USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21.
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